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Plesenton Dr, Worthington, OH 43085


Jeffers Mound is an ancient Native American site that has been the subject of archaeological studies for decades. The first excavation was in 1927, and since then, researchers have uncovered evidence that this mound was created by people who lived here more than 2,000 years ago. But what do we know about them? Why did they build it? What did it mean to them? We’ll never know for sure – all we can do is speculate based on clues from their past.

One of the first things excavators discovered is that Jeffers Mound was built in at least three different stages. The oldest part, near the bottom, has been dated to about 200 BC with a radiocarbon date from charcoal found within one of its postholes. Evidence suggests it was rebuilt around AD 100 and then again sometime before or during European contact with Native Americans.  

Researchers have also recovered numerous artifacts including stone tools such as spear points, scrapers used for working bone and hide; pottery fragments; animal bones which can tell us what they ate – deer were very important but there’s evidence of elk, bison too; flint chips leftover when making stone arrowheads and knives.

These are also a few of the things that have been found in this well-preserved state, many areas of the mound look like typical prairie grasslands covered in a variety of wildflowers. However, they are very obvious signs that reveal that something different lies beneath the little hill. Geologists have discovered that beneath its thin layer of soil and plants, Jeffers Mound is a man-made earthen structure! 

Native Americans are still around today! Things about them like their history or traditions or what they think about preserving these sites. Jeffer mound offers visitors from near and far an opportunity to step back into time! Let’s work together to preserve this landmark so future generations can enjoy its beauty and significance as well!

In this well-preserved state, many areas of the mound look like typical prairie grasslands covered in a variety of wildflowers. However, there are very obvious signs that reveal that something different lies beneath the little hill.

The mound was named after Herman Plesenton Jeffers, who owned the land the mound is situated on before its transfer to the Worthington Historical Society. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974, the same year that the site was donated to the Worthington Historical Society.

Jeffers mound is located adjacent to Carbondale’s East Campus and close to many University buildings including the Landmarks Traffic Circle, Hovey Museum of Egyptology, and the Landmark Noyse Union. Although there are no “formal” hiking trails that exist on the mound, it provides a good place for students who want some quiet time outside and to experience part of what life was like when this site was originally inhabited. Landmarks such as Jeffers Mound continue to help imagine the lives of people who lived on Midwestern Landscapes in the past.

The Landmark is located just north of Stone Quarry Creek and adjacent to its confluence with Clear Creek. It also highlights where Landmarks Traffic Circle, Hovey Museum, and Noise Union are located. You can get a good feel for what it might be like when visiting Jeffers Mound by looking at the map.

Some notable Landmarks include:

The Landmark was part of a film shoot in 1993 for the movie “Groundhog Day” (starring Bill Murray). During one scene, Mr. Murray is seen running away from angry townspeople who were chasing him down the east side of Stone Quarry Creek. From 1960-1978, scenes from movies and TV shows were shot on Landmarks including Jeffers Mound, The Alligator River (at Stone Quarry Creek) Landmark Traffic Circle, and Landmark Rock.

The Landmark Jeffers Mound will continue to be a place where people can engage with nature and learn how various cultures shaped Midwestern Landscapes in the past. Landmarks such as Jeffers Mound will continue to be preserved on Landscapes across North America, and some of them may even become places where people gather for cultural activities!

Worthington, Ohio is blessed with some of the state’s most amazing, must-see landmarks. Here’s a list of some of our favorites:

  • Jeffers Mound
  • Peggy R. McConnell Arts Center of Worthington
  • Griswold Center
  • Orange Johnson House
  • Walnut Grove Cemetery
  • The Old Rectory
  • The Ohio Railway Museum
  • McConnell Arts Center
  • Columbus Zoo and Aquarium 

All of these wonderful landmarks are located just a short distance from our central location at 65 East Wilson Bridge Road in Worthington! Stop by for a visit anytime!

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